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#notwhite chocolate

40.00

Fine quality chocolate with custom-laser cut wooden box designed by the #notwhite collective.

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Ingredients: SUGAR (POLYNESIA, INDIA, PERSIA) “The reed which gives honey without bees” Sugar, or White Gold, as British colonists called it, was the engine of the slave trade that brought millions of Africans to the Americas beginning in the early 16th-century. Profit from the sugar trade was so significant that it may have even helped America achieve independence from Great Britain PALM KERNEL & PALM OIL (SOUTHEAST ASIA, LATIN AMERICA, AFRICA), Oil palm plantations currently cover more than 27 million hectares of the Earth’s surface. Forests and human settlements have been destroyed and replaced by “green deserts” containing virtually no biodiversity on an area the size of New Zealand. COCOA (SOUTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA) Cocoa beans have been a prevalent part of Central American cultures, specifically the Mayan civilization, for hundreds of years. The Mayan civilization worshiped the cocoa tree and gave it the Latin name Cocoa which means “Food of the Gods. NON FAT DRY MILK (MONGOLIA) While Marco Polo wrote of Mongolian Tatar troops in the time of Kublai Khan who carried sun-dried skimmed milk as "a kind of paste",[2] the first modern production process for dried milk was invented by the Russian doctor Osip Krichevsky in 1802. SOY LECITIN (GERMANY) Commercial soy these days is almost always genetically modified meaning pesticide residue galore. Adding insult to injury, the soy lecithin which no doubt contains toxic solvent and pesticide residues is bleached to transform the color from a dirty brownish hue to a light yellow. ALMONDS (CENTRAL & SOUTHEAST ASIA) Originally from central and southwest Asia, almonds became a staple food there that helped sustain the long journeys of nomadic tribes. Wild stands of almond trees grew near trade routes such as the Silk Road that connected central China with the Mediterranean.

Countries: 

Sugar: Polynesia, India, Persia
Palm Kernel and Palm oil: Southeast Asia, Latin America and Africa 
Cocoa: South and Central America
Non-fat dry Milk: Mongolia
Soy Lecithin: Germany
Almonds: central and southwest Asia

Sugar:

“The reed which gives honey without bees” Sugar, or White Gold, as British colonists called it, was the engine of the slave trade that brought millions of Africans to the Americas beginning in the early 16th-century. Profit from the sugar trade was so significant that it may have even helped America achieve independence from Great Britain

Palm Kernel and Palm oil: 

Oil palm plantations currently cover more than 27 million hectares of the Earth’s surface. Forests and human settlements have been destroyed and replaced by “green deserts” containing virtually no biodiversity on an area the size of New Zealand.

Cocoa:

Cocoa beans have been a prevalent part of Central American cultures, specifically the Mayan civilization, for hundreds of years. The Mayan civilization worshiped the cocoa tree and gave it the Latin name Cocoa which means “Food of the Gods.”

Non-fat dry milk:

While Marco Polo wrote of Mongolian Tatar troops in the time of Kublai Khan who carried sun-dried skimmed milk as "a kind of paste",[2] the first modern production process for dried milk was invented by the Russian doctor Osip Krichevsky in 1802.

Soy Lecithin:

Commercial soy these days is almost always genetically modified meaning pesticide residue galore. Adding insult to injury, the soy lecithin which no doubt contains toxic solvent and pesticide residues is bleached to transform the color from a dirty brownish hue to a light yellow.

Almonds:

Originally from central and southwest Asia, almonds became a staple food there that helped sustain the long journeys of nomadic tribes. Wild stands of almond trees grew near trade routes such as the Silk Road that connected central China with the Mediterranean.